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Boy with Thorn

Pitt Poetry

by Rickey Laurentiis

eBook

Winner of the 2016 Levis Reading Prize

Winner of the 2014 Cave Canem Poetry Prize

Finalist for the 2017 Kate Tufts Discovery Award

In a landscape at once the brutal American South as it is the brutal mind, Boy with Thorn interrogates the genesis of all poetic creation—the imagination itself, questioning what role it plays in both our fascinations with and repulsion from a national history of racial and sexual violence. The personal and political crash into one language here, gothic as it is supple, meditating on visual art and myth, to desire, the practice of lynching and Hurricane Katrina. Always at its center, though, is the poet himself—confessing a double song of pleasure and inevitable pain.


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Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
Edition: 1

Kindle Book

  • Release date: September 25, 2015

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780822981060
  • File size: 3970 KB
  • Release date: September 25, 2015

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9780822981060
  • File size: 3970 KB
  • Release date: September 25, 2015


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Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

subjects

Fiction Poetry

Languages

English

Winner of the 2016 Levis Reading Prize

Winner of the 2014 Cave Canem Poetry Prize

Finalist for the 2017 Kate Tufts Discovery Award

In a landscape at once the brutal American South as it is the brutal mind, Boy with Thorn interrogates the genesis of all poetic creation—the imagination itself, questioning what role it plays in both our fascinations with and repulsion from a national history of racial and sexual violence. The personal and political crash into one language here, gothic as it is supple, meditating on visual art and myth, to desire, the practice of lynching and Hurricane Katrina. Always at its center, though, is the poet himself—confessing a double song of pleasure and inevitable pain.


Expand title description text